CLASS-MON Update: Self-Assessment of Attitude and Work in the Classroom

Almost a month ago I introduced the CLASS-MON spreadsheet Add-on. I have to admit that it has been better received than I expected. It is currently installed by just over 11000 users (source: G Suite Marketplace). Today I present an update that basically improves two aspects.


Teachers Comments

Although CLASS-MON is designed more to make students think about the tasks they are doing than to give feedback from the teacher, as the add-on gives the teacher the possibility to evaluate the tasks, I have added the possibility for the teacher to also enter comments.

Simply, in the same cell where you enter the rate of the assignment, you can use the Insert note option, which is displayed with the right mouse button.

Attitude Template

For some students, it is also interesting to help them learn to self-regulate their work time in the classroom. Do they use their time? Do they concentrate and work? Do they get lost all the time?

CLASS-MON can also help us in these cases. When the template is created, CLASS-MON now offers the possibility of Activities (which is the template until now) and the possibility of Attitudes has been added.

The template basically differs in the options it offers in the form.

The student evaluates himself/herself with respect to the attitude and work in the classroom. Instead of introducing activities we will introduce sessions. At the end of each session, the student reflects on how he or she has worked and indicates this on the form. The teacher can also evaluate it and in this way the student compares whether his or her perception coincides with that of the teacher.

The experience of using similar tools (follow-up sheets, daily work grids…) in a significant percentage of the students has an important impact, as long as it is limited to a number of specific sessions. If it is taken as a habit, then it ceases to have an effect.


This is the first update, but I’m sure it won’t be the last. I have started to receive feedback from teachers who have started to use it and this provokes new ideas and new functionalities. Little by little I will try to improve the tool.

CLASS-MON, an add-on to encourage self-evaluation and self-regulation of students

Today I present the project from my participation in the Google Innovators Academy that took place a year ago in Madrid, ESP18. A very rich experience for me, both for the intensive learning and for the relationships with other innovators. During this year Nay Belaunzarán has accompanied me and tutored the project and I only have words of gratitude for her.

But let’s get down to business. Here’s aadd-on for spreadsheets with a very clear purpose. To help students to self-evaluate in order to learn to self-regulate. It may sound very pretentious and the complement is really very simple.

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Do you know the GEG Spain community?

I’m coming back from Madrid on the AVE and I’m taking advantage of these three hours to write a post. I’ve just spent a day and a half with the coordinators of the GEG Spain community. I’ve been one of them for a two years and today I want to talk about the community and its coordinators.

First of all, I want to make it clear, for me it is one of the most important communities I have to improve my teaching practice. Belonging to this community, and especially to the moderation team, makes me evaluate, reflect and improve my work (and passion). Therefore, let me begin by thanking the 13 members of moderation for their work and constant involvement, and the rest of the community for their contributions.

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Single-point rubric: Automate sharing with students

This course we have begun to use in a habitual way and more or less systematic the single-point rubrics. I speak in the plural because it is not only my own thing, but also that of the teachers of my school who work on projects in the 4th year of ESO.

For those of you who do not know single-point rubrics (here the link from where I knew them), they are nothing more than usual analytical rubrics, where only the expert level is indicated and, instead of evaluating by selecting a level, it is necessary to write down which points of each aspect must be improved to become an expert and which points are already correct. In the link you can see different models.

Next, one of the ones we use to evaluate the students’ portfolio.

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Allow copies of forms (documents and presentations)

Google Drive has a few hidden tricks. Some of them I use without knowing too much who told me or where I read it. And one of them is to allow copies of a form without anyone being able to edit our original form.

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